Bloody Good Period

Everyone deserves a bloody good period.

Bloody Good Period provides menstrual products to asylum seekers, refugees and those who can’t afford them throughout the UK. We also provide a burgeoning education programme which works to establish excellent menstrual, sexual and reproductive health literacy in refugee communities.

history Campaign has now closed

It ran from 12:00 PM, 8 March 2022 to 12:00 PM, 22 March 2022

Registered Charity in England and Wales (1185849)

open_in_new https://www.bloodygoodperiod.com/
Check mark Match funded

Campaign target

£50,000

Amount raised

£58,509

Donations

438

Championed by The Big Give Trust (Champion)

    Categories

  • Health/WellbeingHealth/Wellbeing
  • Human Rights/AdvocacyHuman Rights/Advocacy
  • Poverty Alleviation/ReliefPoverty Alleviation/Relief

    Helping

  • Refugees/Asylum SeekersRefugees/Asylum Seekers
  • Women & GirlsWomen & Girls
  • OtherOther

Location

United Kingdom

Situation

We are seeking to address period poverty, which is estimated to affect 3 in 10 women in the UK (including impeding their social participation). Our main beneficiaries are women in London who menstruate and are forced to go without essentials, including period products needed for menstrual health.

Solution

We will provide menstrual products to asylum seekers, refugees, and people that cannot afford them by distributing pads to over 120 drop-in service centres across London and the UK. We'll also run an education programme, providing sexual and reproductive health information and signposting.

  • “Just before my period I knew I really had to get pads urgently and so I would have to go without things like food. I wish that pads were freely available. It is really bad that pads are so expensive because it is something that women have to go through every month. "

    — An asylum-seeking woman living in London, 2019

  • "We are sleeping outside; in the bus, in the park. We are not allowed to work. We don’t have food. It is no good; it gives us too much stress. People don’t see what we are going through. To have to cope with your period on top of all this is too much."

    — Stella