WOMEN'S EDUCATION PARTNERSHIP

Power to the Powerless through Education

WEP is an independent charity providing education for disadvantaged women and girls in Sudan and South Sudan, many of whom have fled violence in their home areas. We deliver basic schooling for girls, teacher training, adult literacy, university scholarships, and eyecare to enable reading.

history Campaign has now closed

It ran from 12:00 PM, 30 November 2021 to 12:00 PM, 7 December 2021

Registered Charity in England and Wales (1151145)

open_in_new http://www.womenseducationpartnership.org
Check mark Match funded

Campaign target

£20,300

Amount raised

£17,734

Donations

72

    Categories

  • Education/Training/EmploymentEducation/Training/Employment

    Helping

  • Refugees/Asylum SeekersRefugees/Asylum Seekers
  • Women & GirlsWomen & Girls
  • Young People (18-30)Young People (18-30)

Location

Sudan

Situation

In Sudan and South Sudan women and girls suffer significant disadvantages in education and life chances. Illiteracy is high among women and girls, particularly those from areas of conflict such as Darfur and the Nuba Mountains in Sudan. In South Sudan, civil war has decimated education and health provision. The Covid-19 pandemic has also meant the closure of schools and universities – girls are particularly in danger of not returning to education.

Solution

Our basic school programme supports orphan children who would not otherwise go to school. Our adult literacy programme covers literacy, numeracy & income generation, and our eyecare outreach treats disorders preventing people from reading. We sponsor university scholarships for disadvantaged young women from displaced refugee populations. In South Sudan we are helping rebuild adult literacy and to support healthcare studies. We welcome donations that can be spread across these areas.

  • "I was looking for the health clinic but I couldn't read the signs. A man standing nearby said 'what's the point of you looking for a clinic when you can't even read? You should stay at home!' I felt angry so I joined our literacy circle. Now I'm proud that I can read. No one will insult me again."

    — One of our literacy circle participants explained why she decided to learn to read:

  • “I am interested in special education at kindergarten level. I aspire to prove to myself and to everyone around me that girls are able to make their own destiny and reach the highest levels of success. I want to help give girls the support they need to solve problems and stand up for their rights."

    — A university scholar at Ahfad University, studying psychology and education said: