Wiltshire Air Ambulance

Night Vision Goggle Campaign

To ensure that we can continue to fly for 19 hours a day we need to update our night vision goggles used by our crew members, our current ones are old and break with no way of repairing them. This is a critical piece of equipment to ensure safe landings particularly in the darker months.

history Campaign has now closed

It ran from 12:00 PM, 30 November 2021 to 12:00 PM, 7 December 2021

Registered Charity in England and Wales (1144097)

open_in_new http://www.wiltshireairambulance.co.uk
Check mark Match funded

Campaign target

£40,000

Amount raised

£42,550

Donations

102

Championed by Wiltshire Match Fund

    Categories

  • Armed Forces/Emergency ServicesArmed Forces/Emergency Services
  • Education/Training/EmploymentEducation/Training/Employment

    Helping

  • General Public/HumankindGeneral Public/Humankind

Location

United Kingdom

Situation

The 4 sets of NVGs (Night Vision Goggles) Wiltshire Air Ambulance currently have and use are old and becoming obsolete. This means that they are starting to break and the spares are not available to fix them. If we have to operate without them this will reduce the number of hours we can operate and serve the communities of Wiltshire, Bath and surrounding areas dramatically. In the winter months as much as 10+ hours a day would be lost.

Solution

Wiltshire Air Ambulance need to purchase 4 new sets of Night Vision Goggles. 3 pairs for the operational crew plus a spare to cover when a set goes away for servicing. These sets will be of a newer generation of image intensification therefore will work better on those nights when there is no moon light and the cloud cover prevents starlight. They will also be more reliable, this is crucial for safety, capability and to keep the crew flying for 19 hours a day.

  • Wiltshire Air Ambulance holds a massive place in my life, along with my whole family. Without the skills of the paramedics and the speed of the helicopter, both arriving at the scene and airlifting me to hospital, I wouldn’t be alive.

    — Dylan Jones - a patient that was attended to by the WAA crew at night.