Renewable World

Keep Kids in School through Access to Clean Water

Keep Kids in School will provide 3,783 children with access to safe drinking water through solar water pumping, toilets and school wash-blocks in the hilly region of Gulmi Durbar Rural Municipality in Nepal, preventing disease transmission and helping children, especially girls, remain in school.

history Campaign has now closed

It ran from 12:00 PM, 1 December 2020 to 12:00 PM, 8 December 2020

Registered Charity in England and Wales (1119467)

open_in_new https://renewable-world.org/
Check mark Match funded

Campaign target

£20,000

Amount raised

£20,201

Donations

54

Championed by The Coles-Medlock Foundation

    Categories

  • Education/Training/EmploymentEducation/Training/Employment
  • Environment/ConservationEnvironment/Conservation
  • Poverty Alleviation/ReliefPoverty Alleviation/Relief

    Helping

  • Children (3-18)Children (3-18)
  • Minority GroupsMinority Groups
  • Women & GirlsWomen & Girls

Location

Nepal

Situation

High up in the remote hill-top villages of Gulmi District in Nepal, few schools have access to a reliable water source. Children must carry drinking water to school and are unable to access toilets with water or wash their hands during the day. This makes all children vulnerable to disease and girls more likely to drop out when they hit puberty. Longterm, it undermines child health and limits girls’ education, often leading to early marriage, teen pregnancy and a lifetime of missed opportunity.

Solution

Keep Kids in School will provide access to clean water in two schools that lie above their nearest water source using solar water pumping technology. In these and a further eight schools, we will construct new toilet blocks, creating child-friendly, gender-specific toilets, wash basins and menstrual hygiene management facilities that allow all children to stay in school and stay healthy. Newly formed children’s clubs will raise awareness on the importance of good hygiene and education for all.

  • I enjoy school. I like learning, meeting my friends and the teachers are nice. But every day I have to bring as much water as I can carry on my walk to school, which is 35 minutes on rough paths. I am lucky, some of my friends walk for one and a half hours.

    — Manisha Karki, aged 16, Ashwori Secondary School, Gulmi, Nepal

  • When the tanker water runs out, the teachers walk with us to get water from a pond half an hour away. In winter this is so tough, it is cold, wet and slippy. It really disrupts our lessons.

    — Urmila Devi Sunaum aged 16, Ashwori Secondary School, Gulmi, Nepal

  • The toilets are so dirty! There is no water for the toilets during the dry season so when we have our periods we stay at home and miss lessons. I want the water and good toilets for my younger sister. That would make me very happy.

    — Deepa Khatri, aged 16, Ashwori Secondary School, Gulmi, Nepal