Whitley Fund for Nature

Whitley Fund for Nature

The Whitley Fund for Nature (WFN) is a nature conservation charity offering funding, profile, and training to proven grassroots conservation leaders in the Global South. Whitley Awards - our flagship conservation prizes - are won competitively and are worth £40,000 in project funding over one year.

history Campaign has now closed

It ran from 12:00 PM, 1 December 2020 to 12:00 PM, 8 December 2020

open_in_new https://whitleyaward.org/

Registered Charity in England and Wales (1081455)

Check mark Match funded

Campaign target

£100,000

Amount raised

£105,561

Donations

112

Championed by Friends of the Reed Foundation

    Category

  • AnimalsAnimals
  • Community Support & DevelopmentCommunity Support & Development
  • Environment/ConservationEnvironment/Conservation

    Helping

  • General Public/HumankindGeneral Public/Humankind
  • OtherOther

Location

Multiple locations

  • "WFN is one of the most cost effective and direct impact charities working to protect the environment."

    — HRH The Princess Royal, WFN Patron

  • "The Whitley Fund for Nature is unique. It doesn’t put its own people on the ground but seeks out local leaders who are already succeeding. It puts its money where it really counts, where every penny counts."

    — Sir David Attenborough, WFN Trustee

  • This is what the Whitley Awards are all about – recognising effective grassroots leaders and helping them expand their work.

    — Kate Humble, WFN Ambassador

Situation

In recent years, our natural world has come under increasing pressure. The planet is facing unprecedented loss of species, accelerating threats from climate change, and large-scale habitat destruction. As these interconnected challenges grow, we face causing irreversible damage to the natural processes that support our existence. The impact of this is devastating, and yet, less than 3% of philanthropic funding goes towards environment-related issues. We believe that this can and must change.

Solution

We need to support local leaders who are running effective conservation projects in those countries experiencing the greatest biodiversity loss. In-country nationals have the local knowledge and skills to address key issues. The benefits extend not just to halting and reversing wildlife decline but, working with communities, their projects can also address a range of social issues, such as human poverty, using strategies that encourage economic growth, all while tackling environmental issues.