ClearVision Project

Creating Dual Print & Braille Children's Books

ClearVision exists to promote & further the education of blind and partially sighted persons and we do this by creating dual print & braille childrens books & operating a free postal lending library of these books to families and organisations across the UK.

open_in_new http://www.clearvisionproject.org

Registered Charity in England and Wales (1012850)

Campaign target

£10,000

Amount raised

£1,604

Time left

61 days

Donations

5

    Category

  • Education/Training/EmploymentEducation/Training/Employment
  • Health/WellbeingHealth/Wellbeing

    Helping

  • Children (3-18)Children (3-18)
  • Older PeopleOlder People
  • People With DisabilitiesPeople With Disabilities

Location

United Kingdom

  • I cannot thank you enough. If you had been here to see the joy on this young boy's face when he opened the boxes and discovered it was full of braille books. He was overjoyed. It was as if someone had given him diamonds. Our entire school is grateful and I hope we can support your amazing charity.

    — Classroom Teacher

  • ClearVision books provide my husband and son with the ability to enjoy stories together; something every parent and child should be able to do. It will also be useful as my son gets older for me to read along as he learns Braille.

    — Gemma, Jacob's Mum

Situation

Sighted children see words everywhere - on buildings, buses, food packets - long before they can read or even know that printed words have meaning. Babies who are blind do not receive that incidental literacy learning, putting them at severe disadvantage compared to sighted peers. By the time a child is five the Department for Education states that a child should be able to read and understand simple sentences. Yet at 5 years old only 17% of visually impaired children know the braille alphabet.

Solution

To help compensate for the lack of incidental learning it is important they are given books containing braille early on, so they start to make the connection between the touch of braille under their hands and the words read aloud to them. Without dual print and braille children’s books it is impossible for this to happen, denying both adult and child a unique and magical childhood experience that is fundamental for their family relationships, wellbeing and ability to read.