Helping Rhinos

Eyes in the Sky - Community Conservation for Rhinos

Helping Rhinos is working in partnership with ARCC (African Rhino Conservation Collaboration) in the Eastern Cape, South Africa, to increase aerial anti-poaching operations and strengthen rhino protection and conservation through local community empowerment.

Donations open 12:00 PM, 3 December 2019 to 12:00 PM, 10 December 2019

open_in_new http://www.helpingrhinos.org

Registered Charity in England and Wales (1155309)

Campaign target

£20,000

Amount raised

£21,627

Donations

148

Championed by The Reed Foundation - Environment & Animals

  • Helping Rhinos is working across Africa, empowering local people to play a key role in protecting the iconic rhino. Siseko's passion has made him a role model in his community and he is helping to show others how wildlife conservation can provide great careers and help improve livelihoods

    — Simon Jones, CEO Helping Rhinos

  • The presence of a plane in and around rhino reserves makes a dramatic difference to visibility of our anti-poaching efforts and acts as a major deterrence for anyone considering entering that rhinos space or attempting to poach.

    — Dr Will Fowlds, Director African Rhino Conservation Collaboration (ARCC)

Situation

Current figures show that on average more than two rhino are killed per day by poachers in SA, with figures for the Eastern Cape rising dramatically compared to previous years. This is unsustainable and if it is allowed to continue unchecked, the rhino will become extinct in the region the next ten years. Involving young members of the local community in the implementation and co-ordination of ARCC’s aerial project will help secure a sustainable rhino stronghold in the Eastern Cape.

Solution

The presence of a plane in and around rhino reserves makes a dramatic difference to the visibility of the anti-poaching efforts and acts as a major deterrence for anyone considering entering that rhinos space or attempting to poach. Airwing presence is probably the most visible sign of a proactive attempt to protect rhinos. The ARCC plane aims to provide monitoring and patrol flights to more than 40,000 hectares of rhino reserves and, as well as game counts, will also include vegetation surveys.