Anti-Slavery International

Protecting child domestic workers from abuse and exploitation

Children working as domestic servants in the developing world are cut off from the normal pleasures of childhood such as playing with friends. Working in partnership with local organisations Anti-Slavery International aims give these children a voice, and the protection they deserve.

history Campaign has now closed

It ran from 6:41 PM, 20 September 2009 to 6:41 PM, 20 September 2009

Registered Charity in England and Wales (1049160)

Amount raised

£5

Donations

1

    Categories

  • Education/Training/EmploymentEducation/Training/Employment

    Helping

  • Children (3-18)Children (3-18)

Location

Situation

In much of the developing world children and especially girls are working as domestic servants. Conditions vary, but a great many are under the minimum age of employment (usually 14), are denied schooling, work excessive hours without pay, and are isolated in their employers’ households, unable to meet other children. As a result they are vulnerable to sexual, physical and mental abuse. Social acceptance of the practice is so entrenched that often the authorities they turn to for help simply return them to their employers. A small grant scheme will benefit projects in East & West Africa, Central & South America, South and South East Asia. These projects will support a wide range of interventions which directly engage and involve child domestic workers in self-help, mutual support, advocacy and personal development initiatives. Research will be conducted to develop simple, replicable tools for the measurement of psychosocial well-being of child domestic workers which will allow workers to identify which factors and circumstances are major determinants of their health and psychosocial well-being; and to inform the development of policy and practice on child domestic work. Advocacy work will focus on increasing the regulation, monitoring and protection given to domestic workers. This will act to prevent abuse and allow for early intervention in situations of exploitation.

Solution