Target Ovarian Cancer

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The UK has one of the worst survival rates for ovarian cancer in Europe – a survival rate that has not improved for 30 years. In comparison breast cancer survival has increased from 50% to 80%. To help improve survival, Target Ovarian Cancer is creating a national grassroots advocacy and research programme for ovarian cancer. This will ensure that the interests of women with ovarian cancer are communicated to all those responsible for setting priorities in healthcare and public policy. We want women’s views to be central to driving improvements towards a longer and better life.

history Campaign has now closed

It ran from 12:00 AM, 7 December 2009 to 11:59 PM, 11 December 2009

open_in_new https://www.targetovariancancer.org.uk/

Registered Charity in England and Wales (1125038)

Check mark Match funded

Campaign target

£82,800

Amount raised

£20

Donations

1

    Category

  • Health/WellbeingHealth/Wellbeing
  • Human Rights/AdvocacyHuman Rights/Advocacy

    Helping

  • Women & GirlsWomen & Girls

Location

Situation

The Advocacy and Research Programme is based on sound understanding of what women need. The Target Ovarian Cancer Pathfinder Study, for the first time records comprehensively the views and experiences of all groups involved in or affected by the disease, including patients, health professionals and research scientists. This study highlights the gaps in current care, practice and funding and identifies concrete opportunities to make progress. It will cost us £120,500 to give women a voice and to help improve their survival. This will fund a wide range of activities, including an international feasibility study led by the lead registry for gynaecological cancers in England. This expert team will investigate why European women have a better survival rate than those in the UK. They will consider the stage at which cancer is diagnosed, diagnostic investigations undertaken, treatments received and the general health of the women concerned. This information will enable women with ovarian cancer to push for the same life chances as women elsewhere in Europe. David Meechan, Director of the Trent Cancer Registry, said “We are delighted to have been asked to carry out this feasibility study for Target Ovarian Cancer. We hope that it will show that it will be possible to undertake a more detailed study to help understand the reasons behind the reported poorer survival rates in the UK compared with other European countries. Were survival rates in England to match the European average, some 400 women would be saved each year.”

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