Cancer Research UK

Understanding Childhood Brain Cancer

We are raising money to support leading cancer specialist Dr Andrew Peet, at the University of Birmingham. This area of Dr Peet’s work centres on treating children with brain tumours, a very difficult process, via a pioneering new method of imaging called magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS).

history Campaign has now closed

It ran from 10:00 AM, 5 December 2011 to 4:00 PM, 22 December 2011

open_in_new https://www.cancerresearchuk.org/

Registered Charity in England and Wales (1089464)

Check mark Match funded

Campaign target

£10,000

Amount raised

£1,995

Donations

22

    Category

  • CancerCancer
  • Health/WellbeingHealth/Wellbeing
  • Medical ResearchMedical Research

    Helping

Location

  • Its not about spending three years in the lab to generate results that can then be applied. It’s happening with real children in real time.

    — Dr Andrew Peet

  • Its not about spending three years in the lab to generate results that can then be applied. It’s happening with real children in real time.

    — Dr Andrew Peet

Situation

In the 1960s, around a quarter of children with cancer survived. Today, three quarters survive and Cancer Research UK is proud to be at the heart of this huge progress but there is still work to be done. Many types of brain tumours are very difficult to treat. In an effort to tailor treatment to individual children, which could improve their chances of survival, Dr Peet and his team are developing new ways to produce images of brain tumours to‘see’ the biochemical processes happening inside.

Solution

Currently doctors use techniques like MRI scans to learn about a tumour’s size and location. Dr Peet’s team are investigating a pioneering imaging technique called magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which probes tumours in depth giving valuable information about what’s happening inside. Using this type of scanning technology, doctors can ‘see’ the biochemical processes happening and monitor the effects of treatment better or predict how an individual child’s tumour will respond to particular drugs