Project AWARE Foundation

CoralWatch

CoralWatch is a simple, non-invasive method to assess and monitor coral reef health with respect to coral bleaching. The CoralWatch method uses a Coral Health Chart with a series of colours that volunteers (divers and snorkelers) match with actual coral colour to determine different stages of coral bleaching and recovery.

history Campaign has now closed

It ran from 4:32 PM, 2 October 2008 to 2:29 PM, 3 March 2015

Registered Charity in England and Wales (1073327)

Donations

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    Categories

  • AnimalsAnimals
  • Community Support & DevelopmentCommunity Support & Development
  • Education/Training/EmploymentEducation/Training/Employment
  • Environment/ConservationEnvironment/Conservation
  • OtherOther

    Helping

  • Older PeopleOlder People
  • Women & GirlsWomen & Girls
  • Young People (18-30)Young People (18-30)
  • OtherOther

Location

Situation

According to World Resources Institute, human activity threatens the health of nearly 60 percent o fthe world's coral reefs. Add to that the estimated 30 percent of all coral reefs that are already dead or serverely damaged and it's easy to see that coral reefs are in desperate need of attention if they are to survive for future generations. Project AWARE partners with CoralWatch, a nonprofit research organization from the University of Queensland, Australia, to involve divers and snorkelers in CoralWatch monitoring activities to make a difference and protect coral reef ecosystems. CoralWatch makes monitoring coral reefs easy. The CoralWatch chart uses a series of colours representing different stages of bleaching and recovery. Data collected by volunteers from monitoring activities is then entered online and analyzed by scientists to answer questions on coral bleaching and recovery patterns as well as the severity and duration of bleaching events. With divers and snorkelers regurlarly visiting sites, scientists will be able to answer questions such as how long it takes for reefs to recover from bleaching and if the health of the reef declines over a certain number of bleaching events.

Solution