free@last

Dads do it too!

Providing assessments and support for dads who are unable to understand and/or fulfil their role as a father.

history Campaign has now closed

It ran from to

Registered Charity in England and Wales (1101078)

Donations

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    Categories

  • Community Support & DevelopmentCommunity Support & Development
  • Education/Training/EmploymentEducation/Training/Employment
  • Health/WellbeingHealth/Wellbeing
  • Human Rights/AdvocacyHuman Rights/Advocacy
  • Poverty Alleviation/ReliefPoverty Alleviation/Relief
  • Sports/RecreationSports/Recreation

    Helping

  • Children (3-18)Children (3-18)
  • Women & GirlsWomen & Girls
  • Young People (18-30)Young People (18-30)
  • OtherOther

Location

Situation

Since 1998 Dads do it too! have been providing support for fathers from the inner city areas of Birmingham, and training other professionals, from around the country, how to develop and deliver relevant services for fathers in their communities. The time has come for us to build on our experience and effectiveness by providing the first centre exclusively for fathers to receive support and advice to effectively fulfil their roles as fathers. It is a common phenomenon that dads have been excluded from parental services, from the pregnancy process right through to legal rights and parental responsible should they not be married to their children’s mother. In very recent years the Governmental and societal viewpoint on this has slowly begun to turn the corner and start addressing fatherhood. However, they have only brought confusion as to the definition of the father’s role and have only commissioned the ‘care industry’ to meet the needs of dads. Many of the services that ‘offer’ support for fathers only ‘invite’ fathers to be engaged, rather than truly understanding the needs of this neglected group and providing specific services for them. It is a well known fact that, on the whole, men will not sit in a circle sharing their problems, in fact many men still believe expressing their emotions to be a sign of weakness. Some organisations and community groups try to address this by providing a ‘service’ for fathers that meets one specific need (like socialising; help with employment; activities with their children etc.). However, there are very few, if any, that meet the holistic needs of the man. By this we mean his relationship with his child/children; his relationship with the children’s mother/mother’s; his ability to fulfil all areas of his role as a father; his own personal development; his ability to be a man; his dreams, hopes and aspirations; and all other areas of his life. The Centre for Fatherhood will enable and equip any father, without distinction, to understand his roles and responsibilities of being a dad (including within his culture, faith, circumstances etc.) and how to become a dad of distinction.

Solution