Families Need Fathers - because both parents matter

Strengthening families after separation

The FNF will develop online resources to ensure that any parent in distress as a result of a disagreement over their children knows what to do. This will ensure that a crisis does not escalate and that rational and child-centred solutions are found to difficult situations.

history Campaign has now closed

It ran from 12:00 PM, 28 November 2017 to 12:00 PM, 5 December 2017

Registered Charity in England and Wales (276899)

Check mark Match funded

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    Categories

  • Community Support & DevelopmentCommunity Support & Development
  • Community Support & DevelopmentCommunity Support & Development
  • Health/WellbeingHealth/Wellbeing
  • Human Rights/AdvocacyHuman Rights/Advocacy
  • Human Rights/AdvocacyHuman Rights/Advocacy

    Helping

Location

Situation

When a parent is faced with loss of contact with their children they can become very desperate. It is often the case that they can no longer see a way forward. Many parents (usually fathers) who are denied contact may also decide that they have no choice but to walk away from their children as the barriers to seeing them are too high. These children consequently find themselves at great disadvantage, whether socially, educationally, financially or emotionally.

Solution

Where conflict is minimised and contact with both parents is maintained after separation, the outcomes for children are greatly improved. Father involvement is also known to place children at reduced risk and improve their social, emotional, and educational attainment as well as improve their relationships on a wider level. FNF therefore works with the parent without care, as well as the wider family to ensure that a child can maintain a relationship with both parents after separation.

  • The FNF helpline gives Dads the support they need to carry on doing what is best for their kids, and not give up hope.

    — Anthony Esler

  • The FNF helpline gives Dads the support they need to carry on doing what is best for their kids, and not give up hope.

    — Anthony Esler