The Boaz Trust

Ccampaign_17609_App_1659

Those awaiting asylum decisions often struggle with depression and isolation as they cannot work or access mainstream support. This inclusive programme of support empowers destitute asylum seekers/refugees to develop/share skills through activities/classes (e.g. English, IT, sewing and gardening).

history Campaign has now closed

It ran from 10:00 AM, 6 December 2012 to 5:00 PM, 19 December 2012

open_in_new https://www.boaztrust.org.uk/

Registered Charity in England and Wales (1110344)

Check mark Match funded

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    Category

  • Community Support & DevelopmentCommunity Support & Development
  • Human Rights/AdvocacyHuman Rights/Advocacy

    Helping

Location

  • "I often have flashbacks of terrible things, but at the sewing class, it calms me to be with my friends and I feel much better when I am here.‚Äù

    — J.

  • In my home country I had my own business, but in the UK I have no rights to university or jobs. I feel like I am killing time. It is very frustrating.

    — Hanes

  • "I often have flashbacks of terrible things, but at the sewing class, it calms me to be with my friends and I feel much better when I am here.”

    — J.

  • In my home country I had my own business, but in the UK I have no rights to university or jobs. I feel like I am killing time. It is very frustrating.

    — Hanes

Situation

Once refused asylum, individuals cannot access higher education, training or employment because they have no recourse to public funds. For those who have come from highly skilled backgrounds, such as engineers, doctors or accountants, or those seeking to develop new skills (for example in English-speaking), life can quickly become boring and meaningless. Asylum seekers struggling with mental health problems can find such problems escalate if they lack community links/social networks.

Solution

Individuals involved in ‘Meaningful Lives’ often report seeing improvements in their mental and physical health, such as improved confidence, self-esteem or fitness, as well as progression with their asylum claim as a result of accessing our support programme. The improvements in people's wellbeing that come from making friends, volunteering, employing new or existing skills, and having structure and purpose in the week, is genuinely life-transforming for many.