Bliss, the special care baby charity

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Having a baby in neonatal care is one of the most stressful events a parent may ever have to face. Bliss Nurses will provide direct non-clinical support to families while they are in hospital, when they need us the most. Our aim is 28 Bliss Nurses - one for every major neonatal intensive care unit.

history Campaign has now closed

It ran from 10:00 AM, 5 December 2011 to 4:00 PM, 22 December 2011

Check mark Match funded

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    Category

  • Community Support & DevelopmentCommunity Support & Development
  • Health/WellbeingHealth/Wellbeing
  • Health/WellbeingHealth/Wellbeing
  • Health/WellbeingHealth/Wellbeing
  • Health/WellbeingHealth/Wellbeing

    Helping

Location

  • ‚ÄúIt was hard being scared to touch him. I didn‚Äôt really feel like his mum. The nurses and doctors were caring for him better than I could.‚Äù

    — Liz Holness, mum to Henry, born at 24 weeks

  • ‚Äú I did find doing Amy‚Äôs cares very intimidating at first, but later, especially when she came out of the incubator, it became a great way to bond.‚Äù

    — Karen Hudson, mum of Amy, born at 31 weeks

  • ‚ÄúLosing Izzy and having Molly admitted to hospital was the most traumatic experience of my life. We felt isolated and absolutely terrified. "

    — Kate Morgan, who gave birth to twins Izzy after 22 weeks and four days, and Molly after 23 weeks and five days

  • “Losing Izzy and having Molly admitted to hospital was the most traumatic experience of my life. We felt isolated and absolutely terrified. "

    — Kate Morgan, who gave birth to twins Izzy after 22 weeks and four days, and Molly after 23 weeks and five days

  • “It was hard being scared to touch him. I didn’t really feel like his mum. The nurses and doctors were caring for him better than I could.”

    — Liz Holness, mum to Henry, born at 24 weeks

  • “ I did find doing Amy’s cares very intimidating at first, but later, especially when she came out of the incubator, it became a great way to bond.”

    — Karen Hudson, mum of Amy, born at 31 weeks

Situation

Already anxious about their vulnerable baby’s future, parents of premature and sick babies can find neonatal units distressing. In the weeks and months following the birth of a premature or sick baby, parents often experience emotions of grief and loss. Mothers of premature babies can also suffer higher levels of anxiety than most and are at greater risk of developing postnatal depression. This can severely affect the bonding process and can also lead to developmental problems for the infant.

Solution

Bliss Nurses, will provide what we call ‘Family centred care’ for babies and their families. Nurses will drive high quality care across all neonatal units in their local area. Each Bliss Nurse’s role will be tailored to local needs – this may include promoting Kangaroo Care, helping families when they arrive or as they are discharged from a hospital unit, promoting breastfeeding or coordinating with community services to support families as they transfer their baby’s care to home.