FareShare

Feeding the Hungry this Christmas

FareShare redistributes surplus food that would otherwise go to waste to 6,723 frontline community groups that support vulnerable people. Whether homeless hostels or children's breakfast clubs, these organisations turn good, in date surplus food into nutritious meals for the people who need it.

history Campaign has now closed

It ran from 12:00 PM, 28 November 2017 to 12:00 PM, 5 December 2017

Registered Charity in England and Wales (1100051)

open_in_new https://fareshare.org.uk/
Check mark Match funded

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Situation

8.4 million people in the UK struggle to put food on the table. More people are turning to the voluntary sector to access healthy food. This is putting small charities under immense pressure as they struggle in the wake of statutory funding cuts. In the UK the food & drink industry wastes at least 270,000 tonnes of edible surplus food annually. This is enough for 650 million meals that could be redistributed to charities to feed hungry people. Instead, a lot of the food is dumped in landfills.

Solution

FareShare works with retailers and suppliers to access their surplus food including fresh fruit and veg, meat and diary. FareShare has worked to deepen relationships with major retailers including ASDA and Tesco and particularly with their suppliers to increase the volume and variety of surplus food we receive. The organisations that receive FareShare food are supporting vulnerable people in society & the food provides a means for charities to engage to get to the cause of their clients hunger.

  • ‚ÄúIt feels like home, sometimes it‚Äôs better than home! I enjoy the social element, the sports on TV and the food. In the future I want to volunteer at WASP and be part of it. Maybe volunteering in the kitchen! This food has saved my life and I think it will save other people‚Äôs lives in the future."

    — Albert is an ex serviceman and a beneficiary of FareShare food at the West Indian Association of Service Personnel.

  • ‚ÄúWe rely quite heavily on the items we do receive as they help with our homeless lunch services. The quality, obviously some of the Tesco Finest range, we get is... they‚Äôre brilliant, the chicken items, the bacon joints. Our homeless people come in they love it!‚Äù

    — Rob is head chef at Ashford Place, a community resource centre that receives FareShare food.

  • “It feels like home, sometimes it’s better than home! I enjoy the social element, the sports on TV and the food. In the future I want to volunteer at WASP and be part of it. Maybe volunteering in the kitchen! This food has saved my life and I think it will save other people’s lives in the future."

    — Albert is an ex serviceman and a beneficiary of FareShare food at the West Indian Association of Service Personnel.

  • “We rely quite heavily on the items we do receive as they help with our homeless lunch services. The quality, obviously some of the Tesco Finest range, we get is... they’re brilliant, the chicken items, the bacon joints. Our homeless people come in they love it!”

    — Rob is head chef at Ashford Place, a community resource centre that receives FareShare food.