The Migraine Trust

Ccampaign_19945_App_2077

The lack of effective, migraine specific treatments for patients reflects our limited understanding of what happens in the brain during a migraine attack. This research will investigate what happens in the brain, which could lead to new migraine specific treatments targeting specific brain areas.

history Campaign has now closed

It ran from 10:00 AM, 5 December 2013 to 5:00 PM, 18 December 2013

Registered Charity in England and Wales (1081300)

Check mark Match funded

Donations

0

    Category

  • Health/WellbeingHealth/Wellbeing
  • Health/WellbeingHealth/Wellbeing
  • Medical ResearchMedical Research

    Helping

Location

Situation

The lack of effective, migraine specific treatments for patients reflects our limited understanding of what happens in the brain during an attack. Recent studies show that a dysfunction of the hypothalamus, an area of the brain involved in behavioural and hormonal circadian rhythms, is involved in migraine. Further research has demonstrated an important role of another area of the brain, the thalamus, in the development of both pain and sensory abnormalities during a migraine attack.

Solution

This project investigates how the hypothalamus and the thalamus interact, related to the development of head pain, aura, sensitivity to light and sound during a migraine. Additionally, how different drugs, which can act within these two key brain areas, may interact with the initiation and development of a migraine. The study will shed light on the sequence of events leading to a migraine and create an opportunity for further research into migraine treatments acting on specific brain areas.