The Vincent Wildlife Trust

Pine Marten Recovery Project

This project is the largest carnivore recovery programme in Britain of its kind and involves translocating pine martens from Scotland to mid Wales to supplement the declining population. Local people and stakeholders will be consulted and given the opportunity to shape the project for local benefit.

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Registered Charity in England and Wales (1112100)

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    Category

  • AnimalsAnimals
  • Environment/ConservationEnvironment/Conservation

    Helping

Location

  • I wholeheartedly support the reintroduction of pine martens to the British countryside. We owe pine martens their rightful place in our landscape

    — Simon King

  • Having searched high and low for pine martens in Wales, I am excited at the prospect of having these wonderful animals back in their former haunts

    — Iolo Williams

  • Having searched high and low for pine martens in Wales, I am excited at the prospect of having these wonderful animals back in their former haunts

    — Iolo Williams

  • I wholeheartedly support the reintroduction of pine martens to the British countryside. We owe pine martens their rightful place in our landscape

    — Simon King

Situation

Following years of persecution and habitat loss, the pine marten is the rarest carnivore in England and Wales. Whilst pine marten populations in Scotland and Ireland are recovering well, pine martens have not recovered in England and Wales and are on the brink of extinction. Intervention is needed urgently for a conservation translocation to boost and restore healthy populations to England and Wales.

Solution

Following an intensive feasibility study in 2014, we have identified the most suitable areas to reinforce declining pine marten populations. We are now preparing to translocate pine martens from Scotland, where there is a healthy population, to an area in mid Wales, where pine martens were once common but are now on the brink of extinction. This area has been identified as the most appropriate as it has suitable habitat, low road density and minimal conflict with humans.