Ovarian Cancer Action

Fighting chemotherapy resistance in ovarian cancer

Almost every woman who dies from ovarian cancer does so because her tumour relentlessly worsens and returns after it becomes resistant to chemotherapy. We are therefore funding research which aims to find ways to overcome this problem and drive up survival rates for ovarian cancer patients.

history Campaign has now closed

It ran from 8:33 AM, 24 June 2011 to 8:33 AM, 24 June 2011

Registered Charity in England and Wales (1109743)

Amount raised

£5

Donations

1

    Category

  • CancerCancer
  • Health/WellbeingHealth/Wellbeing
  • Medical ResearchMedical Research

    Helping

Location

  • As we discover more about resistance we can identify and develop new drugs to increase the effectiveness of chemotherapy for ovarian cancer patients.

    — Dr Euan Stronach

  • As we discover more about resistance we can identify and develop new drugs to increase the effectiveness of chemotherapy for ovarian cancer patients.

    — Dr Euan Stronach

Situation

In the UK, more than 6,500 women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer each year and two in three of these women will die within five years. A main challenge in treating the disease is that cancer cells can become resistant to chemotherapy, making the treatment ineffective and allowing the tumour to return. 70% of women will experience this problem but chemotherapy following surgery is currently the best treatment option, so finding ways to reverse and prevent resistance is crucial to saving lives.

Solution

The Ovarian Cancer Action Platinum Research Group is investigating why seven in ten women develop resistance to chemotherapy by studying the molecular differences between ovarian cancer cell samples donated by ovarian cancer patients both before and after their tumours became resistant. This approach will allow our scientists to develop novel treatments which target the proteins and mechanisms involved in resistance to reverse and prevent this problem.