SeeAbility (The Royal School for the Blind)

Children in Focus Campaign

Disabled children are missing out on the eye care they need with a potentially devastating impact on their lives. SeeAbility wants specialist sight tests available for the 100,000 children in special schools in England. We want an equal right to sight for children with disabilities.

history Campaign has now closed

It ran from 12:00 PM, 29 November 2016 to 12:01 PM, 6 December 2016

Registered Charity in England and Wales (255913)

open_in_new https://www.seeability.org/
Check mark Match funded

Campaign target

£25,000

Amount raised

£50,000

Donations

35

    Categories

  • Health/WellbeingHealth/Wellbeing

    Helping

Location

Situation

Children with learning disabilities are 28 times more likely to have a serious sight problem than other youngsters but are the least likely to have a sight test. There are 100,000 children at special schools. Children with disabilities can find an eye test at the local opticians impossible: new situations, people and places can be very stressful or they may be unable to communicate verbally. Their eye care is being neglected and yet the need for support for these children is the most critical.

Solution

Our specialist optometrists are sight testing in special schools, a safe, familiar and convenient place for these children. We supply, fit and fix the right glasses for each child in school. We communicate with teachers and families so a child has the right support for their visual impairment and to ensure they get used to wearing their glasses. We are building a good evidence base to campaign for a new national programme of sight testing in special schools to effect long term change.

  • We have children whose lives have been transformed by SeeAbility. But thousands of children are missing out and they are the most vulnerable in our society. That has got to be wrong.

    — Kay Charles, Head Teacher at The Village School in North London

  • Ellie finds hospital visits stressful and already misses school to attend many medical appointments. She gets anxious if her routine is disturbed. Having sight tests at her special school means her teacher can communicate with the optometrist and she doesn't miss an entire day of her classes.

    — Alyson, Ellie's mother Perseid School, Merton, South London

  • It‚Äôs terribly sad when we find a child who hasn‚Äôt been able to see properly for a number of years simply because they didn‚Äôt have glasses. But what‚Äôs worse is when you see a child who has permanent sight loss because they didn‚Äôt receive the eye care they required.

    — Paula Spinks-Chamberlain, SeeAbility's Director of Advisory Services

  • We have children whose lives have been transformed by SeeAbility. But thousands of children are missing out and they are the most vulnerable in our society. That has got to be wrong.

    — Kay Charles, Head Teacher at The Village School in North London

  • Ellie finds hospital visits stressful and already misses school to attend many medical appointments. She gets anxious if her routine is disturbed. Having sight tests at her special school means her teacher can communicate with the optometrist and she doesn't miss an entire day of her classes.

    — Alyson, Ellie's mother Perseid School, Merton, South London

  • It’s terribly sad when we find a child who hasn’t been able to see properly for a number of years simply because they didn’t have glasses. But what’s worse is when you see a child who has permanent sight loss because they didn’t receive the eye care they required.

    — Paula Spinks-Chamberlain, SeeAbility's Director of Advisory Services