Ndi Moyo

The place giving life in Malawi

Palliative care is thin on the ground in sub-Saharan Africa. Ndi Moyo Palliative Care Centre, Malawi is a beacon of hope for many patients with cancers & HIV/AIDS symptoms. The project will enable patients to receive high quality care whilst training other health workers to disseminate these ideas

history Campaign has now closed

It ran from 12:00 PM, 29 November 2016 to 12:01 PM, 6 December 2016

Registered Charity in England and Wales (1111045)

open_in_new http://www.ndimoyo.org
Check mark Match funded

Campaign target

£8,000

Amount raised

£13,455

Donations

22

    Categories

  • Disaster ReliefDisaster Relief

    Helping

Location

Situation

Malawi is one of the poorest 10 countries in the world with a high prevalence of HIV/AIDS and many related cancers. Radiotherapy is not available and most patients are diagnosed too late for cure. Palliative care coverage is patchy in sub-Saharan Africa and many die in pain or with anxiety as to the future of their children. In Malawi, centres have grown up allied to 2 main hospitals but many rural areas are without care and there is great need to train medical personnel in holistic care.

Solution

Ndi Moyo delivers patient-centred, home-based care to a 400,000 population of Salima and its surrounding rural area. It uses low cost methods, easily taught and replicated, with simple medicines, oral liquid morphine and nutritional support. It has links with other palliative care providers including UK hospices, runs training courses and takes students for practical placements so that they will be able to disseminate similar techniques, and increase the number of patients who can be reached.

  • Our mother died in her bed with the shine of hope in her face. We could not afford to buy her medicine, but you allowed her to die in peace.

    — A cancer patient's family

  • Palliative Care is not about adding days to life but adding life to the days that remain.

    — Lucy Finch, Founder of Ndi Moyo, quoted in the BBC 100 women 2016.

  • I met so many wonderful people: Beatrice who was on crutches, but still managed to dance with a smile that stretched from ear to ear; Janet, a lady with a hauntingly sad personal story, but a smile which came from deep within her heart...

    — A volunteer, writing about the annual, New Year Party

  • Our mother died in her bed with the shine of hope in her face. We could not afford to buy her medicine, but you allowed her to die in peace.

    — A cancer patient's family

  • I met so many wonderful people: Beatrice who was on crutches, but still managed to dance with a smile that stretched from ear to ear; Janet, a lady with a hauntingly sad personal story, but a smile which came from deep within her heart...

    — A volunteer, writing about the annual, New Year Party

  • Palliative Care is not about adding days to life but adding life to the days that remain.

    — Lucy Finch, Founder of Ndi Moyo, quoted in the BBC 100 women 2016.