Amigos Worldwide

Equip 7 communities in Uganda to overcome poverty

Through delivering training in beekeeping and conservation farming, communities will have the opportunity to lift themselves out of poverty through the work of their own hands. Nutrition and health will improve, income will increase, and people will be able to afford medicine and pay school fees.

history Campaign has now closed

It ran from 12:00 PM, 29 November 2016 to 12:01 PM, 6 December 2016

Registered Charity in England and Wales (1119450)

Check mark Match funded

Campaign target

£20,000

Amount raised

£30,310

Donations

10

    Category

  • Disaster ReliefDisaster Relief
  • Poverty Alleviation/ReliefPoverty Alleviation/Relief

    Helping

Location

  • 'Before I joined the group I used to harvest 5 sacks of beans per season, per acre, but I doubled my harvest to 10 sacks in the very first season I tried conservation farming. Thanks to my new marketing skills I have trebled my income, my family never go hungry and my kids are back in school.'

    — Kemis Okura, Masindi, member of an existing Amigos farming group

  • 'Middle men think they are clever at playing with farmers' minds, but we are cleverer than them now. They won't confuse us with their low prices, we will store our produce until prices shoot up. The money we make will go into a group account so members can take out loans to boost small businesses.'

    — Stella, farming group leader in Kitgum

  • 'I have been keeping bees for a long time but traditional hives produce little honey, it is of poor quality and I don't know the best way to harvest and sell it. I know I can make good money from honey as there is a market for it, but I need training on modern beekeeping practices.'

    — Bosco Ochola, Kitgum

  • 'Before I joined the group I used to harvest 5 sacks of beans per season, per acre, but I doubled my harvest to 10 sacks in the very first season I tried conservation farming. Thanks to my new marketing skills I have trebled my income, my family never go hungry and my kids are back in school.'

    — Kemis Okura, Masindi, member of an existing Amigos farming group

  • 'Middle men think they are clever at playing with farmers' minds, but we are cleverer than them now. They won't confuse us with their low prices, we will store our produce until prices shoot up. The money we make will go into a group account so members can take out loans to boost small businesses.'

    — Stella, farming group leader in Kitgum

  • 'I have been keeping bees for a long time but traditional hives produce little honey, it is of poor quality and I don't know the best way to harvest and sell it. I know I can make good money from honey as there is a market for it, but I need training on modern beekeeping practices.'

    — Bosco Ochola, Kitgum

Situation

Nearly half of people living in northern Uganda do not have enough food to eat and 33% of children experience stunted growth. Farming skills were lost when war raged in northern Uganda for 20 years and low productivity is a direct result of poor farming methods, inadequate storage facilities and lack of marketing skills. Many households struggle to afford basic essentials and 75% of children do not have the opportunity to complete their secondary education as families can’t afford the fees.

Solution

Training in conservation farming will enable families to increase crop yields up to four-fold. In previous Amigos farming groups 80% of members have enjoyed increased income and food security. Beekeeping will provide diversification, increasing income ten-fold, providing much needed nutrition and promoting pollination which will increase crop yields. To complement this, we would construct a grain store where farmers can keep their crops as they wait for prices to rise.