The University of Nottingham Impact Campaign

Hope for Children with Ependymoma Tumours

When children are diagnosed with a brain tumour the first questions asked by parents are 'What has caused this to happen?' and 'Is it genetic?'. By understanding genetic alterations we could identify children who are predisposed to develop ependymomas, enabling treatment at the earliest opportunity

history Campaign has now closed

It ran from 12:00 PM, 29 November 2016 to 12:01 PM, 6 December 2016

Check mark Match funded

Campaign target

£40,000

Amount raised

£55,580

Donations

72

    Category

  • CancerCancer
  • Education/Training/EmploymentEducation/Training/Employment
  • Health/WellbeingHealth/Wellbeing
  • Medical ResearchMedical Research

    Helping

Location

  • Funding research into Childhood brain tumours is the key to improving diagnosis & treatments and ultimately increasing survival of these difficult to treat tumours whilst also reducing disability rates.

    — Professor Richard Grundy

  • Funding for research into children‚Äôs brain tumours is of vital importance and without it we simply wouldn‚Äôt have excellent facilities like the CBTR producing life-saving new therapies and advances in patient care.

    — Glenis Willmott, MEP

  • Funding research into Childhood brain tumours is the key to improving diagnosis & treatments and ultimately increasing survival of these difficult to treat tumours whilst also reducing disability rates.

    — Professor Richard Grundy

  • Funding for research into children’s brain tumours is of vital importance and without it we simply wouldn’t have excellent facilities like the CBTR producing life-saving new therapies and advances in patient care.

    — Glenis Willmott, MEP

Situation

Ependymoma is a rare tumour of the nervous system, most commonly found in the brain and is the third most common childhood brain tumour. Almost 40% of children diagnosed with ependymoma do not survive. Our researchers aim to identify what might cause neonatal and infant ependymoma.

Solution

Identifying predisposition genes will help with screening and early detection of the disease so that emerging ependymoma can be detected at the earliest moment. Carrying out a new clinical trial that will allow us to accrue blood and cerebro spinal fluid in a trial setting in which we can test ependymoma signatures of recurring or residual disease in circulating DNA and CSF markers that will help in the screening process.