Reverse Rett

Out SMaRT Rett

Rett Syndrome is caused by a mutated gene called MECP2. The gene makes a protein which everyone needs for normal brain function. Scientists at Edinburgh University are exploring a new approach, SMaRT technology as a means of restoring Mecp2 protein and correcting 97% of Rett mutations at source.

history Campaign has now closed

It ran from 12:00 PM, 27 November 2018 to 12:00 PM, 4 December 2018

open_in_new http://www.reverserett.org.uk

Registered Charity in England and Wales (1136809)

Check mark Match funded

Campaign target

£40,000

Amount raised

£74,217

Donations

141

    Category

    Helping

Location

  • While traditional drug approaches will likely be restricted to correcting specific aspects of what goes wrong in Rett it is conceivable that gene therapy can correct the cause of Rett at its very source and thus provide a profound recovery of function.

    — Stuart Cobb

  • While traditional drug approaches will likely be restricted to correcting specific aspects of what goes wrong in Rett it is conceivable that gene therapy can correct the cause of Rett at its very source and thus provide a profound recovery of function.

    — Stuart Cobb

Situation

Rett Syndrome is a devastating condition affecting previously healthy little girls, robbing them of their speech, mobility and the use of their hands in early childhood. There is no cure. Gene therapy has been shown to reverse Rett in murine models of the disease. In GT, broken genes are replaced with an entire copy of the working gene, which can then make the protein. But too much Mecp2 protein is as dangerous as too little. The level needs to be in the Goldilocks zone, ‘just right.’

Solution

Rather than replacing the entire gene, including DNA, SMaRT technology works at the RNA level, allowing scientists to ‘splice out’ the disease causing regions of RNA and bridge healthy RNA together. The advantage of this approach is precision. If effective, SMaRT technology could deliver healthy Mecp2 back to cells without the chance of delivering too much. The goal of the project is to create a single SMaRT therapy that can be moved into development as a therapy for humans, correcting 97%