The Hebridean Trust

Protecting nationally important bird species

The project monitors nationally important bird species and their habitats under threat on the Treshnish Isles. There is an emphasis on voluntary work and active involvement in hands-on activities.

history Campaign has now closed

It ran from 10:00 AM, 6 December 2010 to 10:00 AM, 4 January 2011

Registered Charity in England and Wales (285629)

Check mark Match funded

Campaign target

£4,700

Amount raised

£4,828

Donations

8

    Category

  • Environment/ConservationEnvironment/Conservation

    Helping

Location

  • "When I was asked to join, I jumped at the chance to put my skills and training to good use."

    — Tim Dixon

  • "The annual survey is one of the UK's longest established seabird surveys."

    — Tim Dixon, volunteer

  • "The year-on-year data we collect is essential to the conservation of many bird species on the Treshnish Isles."

    — Tim Dixon, volunteer

  • "When I was asked to join, I jumped at the chance to put my skills and training to good use."

    — Tim Dixon

  • "The year-on-year data we collect is essential to the conservation of many bird species on the Treshnish Isles."

    — Tim Dixon, volunteer

  • "The annual survey is one of the UK's longest established seabird surveys."

    — Tim Dixon, volunteer

Situation

The Treshnish Isles have Site of Special Scientific Interest status, classification as a Special Protection Area under the EC Directive on the Conservation of Wild Birds, designation as a Special Area of Conservation and are adopted by the European Commission as a Site of Community Importance. There are, however, significant threats to the seabird populations, including the impacts of tourism on nesting seabirds, the introduction of alien species and activities in the local marine environment.

Solution

A group of volunteers will monitor, through ringing and census work, the breeding seabird populations, including the storm petrel, manx shearwater and puffin, in addition to the threatened corncrake, of the Treshnish Isles. Without the surveys we do not have a baseline to make management judgements about threats to the seabird populations. The data supplied are of great conservation value being the sole means of monitoring the colonies of the Treshnish Isles.